Media: Chapter 5

Bringing together key tensions of the previous chapters, chapter 5, “Heritage Stories,” explores how festivals enact discrepant ideals of cultural citizenship. Throughout France, annual festivals dedicated to Django and his legacy are coordinated by an array of organizations. These festivals typically foreground Manouche performers and/or so-called Manouche aesthetic traits, resulting in both empowerment and exploitation of Manouche artists and their communities. I outline how endeavors to engage (or exclude) Manouche constituencies at several festivals reflect contrasting political and economic agendas, from those that seek to meaningfully involve Manouches to those that serve mainly to promote tourism. As frames for developing emplaced narratives about belonging, festivals materialize a variety of localized, future-oriented social imaginaries. Such visions for the future may seek to preserve the status quo of interracial power relations, or to reimagine the very terms of French cultural citizenship.

 

* Note: All media on this page was captured by Siv B. Lie unless otherwise credited.

 

Figure 2 (p. 155): Postcard for 2004 Festival Gipsy Swing. Image designed by Jean-François Orillon for the Service d’Accueil des Gens du Voyage “Les Perrins.”

APPONA’s Festival International Tzigane (pp. 159-67)

Image 5.1: Map of the Parc de la Citadelle (p. 159). Source: Google Maps.

Photo gallery 5.1: Festival brochures and publicity

 

Click on the images below to enlarge. Click "image descriptions" under the gallery for more information.

  • 5.1.1. Brochure for 1991 festival, “Festival Européen Tzigane.” Source: Archives de la Ville et de l’Eurométropole de Strasbourg, 168 Z.

  • 5.1.2. Newspaper article featuring Alsatian musicians who performed in the film Latcho Drom. The 1994 festival would be titled “Latcho Drom.” Dernières Nouvelles d’Alsace, 10 Nov 1993. Source: Archives de la Ville et de l’Eurométropole de Strasbourg, 168 Z.

  • 5.1.3. Newspaper article featuring Sony Reinhardt and Dino Mehrstein in advance of the 1994 festival, “Latcho Drom.” L’Alsace, 10 Jul 1994. Source: Archives de la Ville et de l’Eurométropole de Strasbourg, 168 Z.

  • 5.1.4. Brochure for 1996 festival, “Nevo Drom.” Source: private APPONA archive, courtesy of Stella Funaro.

  • 5.1.5. Brochure for 1997 festival, “Autour de la Méditerranée.” Source: private APPONA archive, courtesy of Stella Funaro.

  • 5.1.6. Brochure for 1998 festival, “Romani Havo Drom.” Source: Archives de la Ville et de l’Eurométropole de Strasbourg, 168 Z.

  • 5.1.7. Brochure for 1999 festival, “Choukar Drom.” Source: Archives de la Ville et de l’Eurométropole de Strasbourg, 168 Z.

  • 5.1.8. Newspaper article featuring the Manouche fashion show that occurred during the 1999 festival. Dernières Nouvelles d’Alsace, 2 Jul 1999. Source: Archives de la Ville et de l’Eurométropole de Strasbourg, 168 Z.

  • 5.1.9. Brochure for 2000 festival, “Festival Européen Tzigane.” Source: Archives de la Ville et de l’Eurométropole de Strasbourg, 168 Z.

  • 5.1.10. Brochure for 2002 festival, “Festival Européen Tzigane.” Source: Archives de la Ville et de l’Eurométropole de Strasbourg, 168 Z.

  • 5.1.11. Brochure for 2003 festival, “Entre Rhin et Danube.” Source: Archives de la Ville et de l’Eurométropole de Strasbourg, 168 Z.

Photo gallery 5.2: Liner notes to Maré Sinté  album (pp. 164-6)

 

Click on the images below to enlarge. Click "image descriptions" under the gallery for more information.

  • 5.2.1. Maré Sinté album cover.
  • 5.2.2. Dino Mehrstein (guitar) and Engé Helmstetter (guitar and vocals).
  • 5.2.3. Roundo Hoffmann (vocals) and Tchatchi Helmstetter (vocals and dance).
  • 5.2.4. Batchi Schumacher (vocals, violin, clown) and Lydia Schuler (vocals and dance).
  • 5.2.5. Yorgui Loeffler (guitar) and description: "This CD is the sum of the musical pieces interpreted in the context of the Tsigane musical “Maré Sinté.” The repertoire consists of original compositions by Engé Helmstetter as well as Tsigane standards. “Maré Sinté,” which means “Our Tsigane Family,” is a project that brings together numerous leaders from Alsatian Manouche ensembles.”
  • 5.2.6. Tchatcho Helmstetter (violin) and Cornan Loeffler (rhythm guitar).
  • 5.2.7. Gérald Muller (bass) and Fabrice Lauer (clarinet).
  • 5.2.8. Track listing.
  • 5.2.9. Back cover.

The Festival Django Reinhardt (pp. 167-73)

Image 5.2: Map of the Île du Berceau (p. 170). Source: Google Maps.

Footage of the 1978 festival

Video 5.1: “Minor Swing,” performed by Svend Asmussen, Boulou Ferré, Elios Ferré and Louis Vola, at the 1978 edition of the Festival Django Reinhardt. Source: Teddy Dupont.

Festival Walk-through videos

Video 5.2: Footbridge to the Île du Berceau, June 2013.

Video 5.3: Vendor area, June 2013.

Video 5.4: Luthier tents and concessions, June 2013.

Luthier stands

Video 5.5: Young guitarists jamming and onlookers, June 2013.

Video 5.6: L to R: Billy Weiss, Olli Soikkeli, and Adrien Marco jamming to “Webster,” June 2013. 

Homages to Django (p. 168)

Image 5.3: Statue of Django in Samois-sur-Seine. Photo credit: Meet Me at Samois: A Documentary.

Figure 3 (p. 168): Ceremony at the grave of Django Reinhardt, Samois-sur-Seine, 1 July 2012.

Samoreau (pp. 171-2)

Audio example 5.1: The sounds of a late-night jam session.

 

Video 5.7: Jam on “I’ll See You in My Dreams.” Some of the musicians include Sébastien Giniaux, Mathieu Chatelain, and Noé Reinhardt (guitars), and William Brunard (bass). June 2014.

Further information about recent and upcoming festival programming can be found on the Festival Django Reinhardt website.

The Festival Jazz Manouche de Zillisheim (pp. 173-81)

Image 5.3: Map of the festival site at Zillisheim. Source: Google Maps.

Figure 4 (p. 174): Map of the Festival Jazz Manouche de Zillisheim.

Photo gallery 5.3: A tour of the Zillisheim festival space

 

Click on the images below to enlarge. Click "image descriptions" under the gallery for more information.

  • 5.3.1. Sign on rue de Hochstatt directing visitors to the festival site. 2013.
  • 5.3.2. View of the festival grounds from the second floor of the Salle Polyvalente. 2014.
  • 5.3.3. View of the festival grounds from the second floor of the Salle Polyvalente. 2014.
  • 5.3.4. Inside the Salle Polyvalente. 2014.
  • 5.3.5. A branded caravan selling arts and crafts. 2018.
  • 5.3.6. Photo display by APPONA 68 inside the Salle Polyvalente. 2018.
  • 5.3.7. Photo display by APPONA 68 inside the Salle Polyvalente. 2018.
  • 5.3.8. Photo display by APPONA 68 inside the Salle Polyvalente. 2018.
  • 5.3.9. Fléco Lafertin and his ensemble performing outside in 2018 (see pp. 178-9).
Luthier stands
Luthier stands (image 5.4)

Image 5.4: The luthier stands in 2013.

Luthier stands (image 5.5)

Image 5.5: The luthier stands in 2014.

Luthier stands (image 5.6)

Image 5.6: An evening jam at the stands in 2014.

Luthier stands (image 5.7)

Image 5.7: Children at the stands in 2014.

Video 5.8: View from the luthier stand. 2013.

Photo gallery 5.4: Performances at the 2013 festival

 

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  • 5.4.1. L to R: Zaïti Lafertin, Fléco Lafertin, Dorno Loeffler, and Guillaume Singer.

  • 5.4.2. L to R: Gigi Loeffler, William Brunard, and Billy Weiss.

  • 5.4.3. L to R: Cédric Loeffler, Marcel Loeffler, Gautier Laurent (bass), and Engé Helmstetter.

  • 5.4.4. L to R: Francko Mehrstein, Dorado Schmitt, Gino Roman, and Samson Schmitt.

  • 5.4.5. View of audience.

  • 5.4.6. View of audience.

Concert videos from the 2013 festival

Video 5.9: “Coquette,” performed by Yorgui Loeffler (guitar), William Brunard (bass), and Stochelo Rosenberg (guitar).

Video 5.10: “Minor Swing,” performed by, L to R: Dorado Loeffler, Hugo, Fléco Lafertin, Yorgui Loeffler, Magnio Loeffler, William Brunard (bass), Stochelo Rosenberg, Zaïti Lafertin, and Billy Weiss.

Concert videos from the 2014 festival

Video 5.11: “Hungaria,” performed by (L to R) Djanito Félix, Esteban Félix (bass), Youri Félix, and Sébastien Félix.

Video 5.12: “Sweet Georgia Brown,” performed by (L to R) Dorno Loeffler, Christophe Reinhardt (bass), Fléco Lafertin, and Zaïti Lafertin. Dorno was the brother of Mito Loeffler, and Fléco and Zaïti are Mito’s sons.

Video 5.13: The Gypsy Kids, featuring (L to R) Hugo, Julien Moneret (bass), Magnio Loeffler, and Mickey, performing an original composition by Magnio Loeffler.

Further information about the Festival Jazz Manouche de Zillisheim, including media, can be found on its website. Numerous videos are available on YouTube, including the channel of André “Rollmops” Berger. Rollmops also created a tribute to Mito Loeffler on his website